Date   

Sound Rowers Annual Meeting Photos available

Michael Lampi <lampi@...>
 

They can be seen at

http://snorlax.lampi.org/images/031206/INDEX.HTM

Enjoy!

--Michael Lampi


Sound Rowers calendar now available

Michael Lampi <lampi@...>
 

I went through the photos from this year and plastered them into a
rudimentary calendar for December 2003 through December 2004.

To make things easier for people I saved each month as a JPEG file,
which can be downloaded and printed on your printer. Each file is
about 250 KB.

I did this in MS Publisher, so if anyone wants the 25+ MB .pub file
I'd be willing to make that available as well.

The URL is

http://snorlax.lampi.org/images/SRCalendar/calendar2003-4.htm

Merry Christmas!

Michael Lampi


Race Registration & Timing Software

Michael Lampi <lampi@...>
 

At the annual meeting Jeff Knakal brought out some work he had been
doing with Excel spreadsheets to help make life easier for race
directors to get their job done. I did not get a chance to get a close
look at it, but it seemed to be pretty good from what he described.

His work spurred me to checking into what sorts of race-related
software might be available for PDA's (Personal Digital Assistants),
such as Palm and PocketPC's. I figured that if such software did not
exist it might be something that I could work on in whatever free time
I had.

Well, as it turns out, there is a pretty comprehensive program
available. It is called "RecordTime", and runs on PocketPC's such as
the Compaq iPAQ and other ARM, SH3 or MIPS-based PDA's. It is
shareware, with a fully functional program available that costs $30.

This software handles
1. The registration process, with user-defined classes, categories,
divisions, race numbers, etc.
2. Stopwatch function, with ability to handle race laps, DNF, etc.
3. Generation of HTML and table-based race results that can be
imported into Excel for further work.

The registration process is rather cool in that if a racer registers
at *any* race, then his name (with class info already included) is
available to be entered in any new race he enters.

The stopwatch user interface is pretty simple. Click on "start" to
start the race, then (for most races) click on the racer's number when
they cross the finish line. The racer's number then disappears from
the "active racer" window.

For the lap races, you do the same thing, except the racer's number
will remain in the active racer window until the final lap is
finished. There is a "catchup" button if things get too hairy.

http://members.rogers.com/cognidyne/recordtime.htm

--Michael Lampi


Anyone know how to reach Mike Bills?

MischaUriah
 

If so, please pass his info along to me. Or, if you'd rather, feel free to share my
email address with him.

Thanks!
Mischa Burnett


warm us up a little

Reivers Dustin
 

I had expected a more lively discussion thread amoungst this group.
Maybe I'll try going first. In the past, responses to my posts have
been sent to my email which breaks the discussion off (no one else
can converse). Do we lack a moderator or something?

Excellent idea from Jeff K. in using Excel to get race times
organized. Even better to use PDA's for this (I don't want to risk
my laptop around the finish line). I'll look for a Palm OS version
of the software (anyone find this already?).

On the world wide Yahoo group site for surfski's a Seattle lady was
asking about a starting surfski. I sent her the Sound Rower's web
site.

Is anyone here proud of their cold weather clothing system? I'm
leaning toward dry suit bottom w/ windbreaker top. Someone told me
they use the cheapo rubber-coated cotton gloves just fine.

Whatup y'all?


Re: warm us up a little

Dale Reed <dale-reed@...>
 

Is anyone here proud of their cold weather clothing system?
By coincidence I was thinking about this subject just this morning. I have
not competed with you all since I won a couple-three ribbons during the
93/94 seasons. I paddle a Mariner Max and wondered what was the latest
bestest clothing just in case I decided to get back into kayaking.

I retired from Boeing with an aluminum handshake in 95 I have been spending
way too much time in cyberspace and need to get out more. Dale
---
$ dale-reed@... Seattle, Washington USA $


Race finish Software

Reivers Dustin
 

For those owning Palm based hand-helds I see three applications that
might work. The one that appears best is "PocketTimer" built by
Stevens Creek Software. This is available from Handango for $50.00

I've downloaded a trial version of this package and it looks really
good. It appears simple enough that a volunteer with little exposure
to a hand-held could manage finish times with a borrowed unit.

With this (or similar) system I could probably single-hand the finish
of a Sound Rower race. I'm thinking of Mickey and me barking away at
each other at the last Lake Samish race while trying hard to also
keep the finish clear of spectators and bandits.

Micheal Lampi, you should get a free race entry for this idea!


cold weather clothes

Laura Jackson
 

As primarily a year round ski paddler, I like the "fuzzy rubber" bottoms made by companies like NRS or wyoming wear. I was given a pair of the new Nike mid-height paddling booties, and they are very warm and comfortable to walk around in, also. For tops, I was really lovin' my Lotus shirt that I think was called "core skin" along with the Lotus/Patagonia top called "EKG", but I think they've been discontinued. I recently got a zip front polypro top from JL Racing, and that is rapidly becoming my favorite cold-day shirt. My husband, who paddles a trad sea kayak, loves his JL tights and shirts, under the EKG top for his winter paddling workouts.

For cold day rowing, nothing beats my JL Racing uni-tights, with a polypro or coolmax top underneath. Our women's 4 went rowing this AM at 37 degrees and were all toasty in our mix n match JL's.

Laura Jackson

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Re: clothing - great post Laura

Reivers Dustin
 

This is more like it. I'm going after the booties and JL stuff you
mention. I'm too cheap for dry-suit bottoms, but need something for
the legs. Maybe just cheesy lookin' rain pants?

RD


hands-free hydration

dlkjr@...
 

On a similar note, has anyone rigged up a workable hands-free hydration system for
use with their surfski (or decked kayak)? How do you keep the tube/mouthpiece near
your mouth? Where do you put the water bag? Benefits and disadvantages?

I've tried a few things for the mouthpiece. As for the clips that come with most
systems, I've tried both one and two, in combination with tape around the tube, but
never had much luck keeping the mouthpiece within reach. The tube needs to be
stiffened and held in place better. I experimented with a wedge-shaped piece of
foam. I carved a "trough" to accomodate the tube, and taped it in. Then I rigged up
a "necklace" to hold it near neck-level. This worked well, but I didn't like wearing the
necklace because it was a hassle to get on and off, and seemed like it could cause a
problem if I came out of/off of the boat. Then I tried velcroing the foam to my PFD.
This seemed better. With both foam solutions, the foam was semi-permanently
attached to the tube, and kind of hassle in terms of filling and cleaning the system.

Previously I'd only used the hydration with decked boats. I tried putting the bag both
in front of and behind me. It was a real hassle to run the tube up through the skirt,
clothes, PFD, etc. Recently I got a surfski and a Platypus PFD hydrator. The bag
holder attaches easily to the back of a PFD, and works fine. However, I'm not sure
what I'll do if I'm not wearing a PFD (when it's strapped to the deck for a race). Also,
the Platypus tube seems stiffer than my Camelback tube, and so far I've had good luck
using a clip and some tape around the tube to hold it near my mouth.


Re: hands-free hydration

guy washburn <guido02474@...>
 

Hi,

These folks have the pieces are parts that can be
assembled to a nice drinking system:

http://www.jjcanoe.com/index.html

I had them make me a shorter version of their bite
valve drinking tube. Their neck strap (with the wire
inside) does a good job at keeping the mothpiece
within reach. I use Platypus Big-Zip containers and
put them under the bungies on the back deck of the ski
or behind the seat of my kayaks (also attached with a
bungie so it doesn't slide). It just takes a second to
slip the tube through the skirt top and velcro it onto
the neck strap as I get in so I usually don't think
twice about it. Wearing a half gallon of water on you
pfd raises the center of gravity more then I like and
messes up rotation.

I also have (but have not installed) the SA Tripper
hydration system that goes on the deck infront of you
on the ski. It looks to be well made but I am
skeptical at how you would keep the permantly mounted
bladder clean so I haven't used it. It is well thought
of in SA Ski circles though. OceanPaddlesports sells 1
and 3 litre sizes

Hope this helps.

Guy
--- dlkjr@... wrote:
On a similar note, has anyone rigged up a workable
hands-free hydration system for
use with their surfski (or decked kayak)? How do
you keep the tube/mouthpiece near
your mouth? Where do you put the water bag?
Benefits and disadvantages?

I've tried a few things for the mouthpiece. As for
the clips that come with most
systems, I've tried both one and two, in combination
with tape around the tube, but
never had much luck keeping the mouthpiece within
reach. The tube needs to be
stiffened and held in place better. I experimented
with a wedge-shaped piece of
foam. I carved a "trough" to accomodate the tube,
and taped it in. Then I rigged up
a "necklace" to hold it near neck-level. This
worked well, but I didn't like wearing the
necklace because it was a hassle to get on and off,
and seemed like it could cause a
problem if I came out of/off of the boat. Then I
tried velcroing the foam to my PFD.
This seemed better. With both foam solutions, the
foam was semi-permanently
attached to the tube, and kind of hassle in terms of
filling and cleaning the system.

Previously I'd only used the hydration with decked
boats. I tried putting the bag both
in front of and behind me. It was a real hassle to
run the tube up through the skirt,
clothes, PFD, etc. Recently I got a surfski and a
Platypus PFD hydrator. The bag
holder attaches easily to the back of a PFD, and
works fine. However, I'm not sure
what I'll do if I'm not wearing a PFD (when it's
strapped to the deck for a race). Also,
the Platypus tube seems stiffer than my Camelback
tube, and so far I've had good luck
using a clip and some tape around the tube to hold
it near my mouth.


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Re: hands-free hydration

Michael Lampi <lampi@...>
 

Thanks for the info on the drinking systems, Guy. The prices
seem quite reasonable.

Do they make the water taste like plastic?

Maybe next year I won't have so many water & juice bottles
rolling around the cockpit of my boat!

--Michael Lampi

-----Original Message-----
From: guy washburn [mailto:guido02474@...]

Hi,

These folks have the pieces are parts that can be
assembled to a nice drinking system:

http://www.jjcanoe.com/index.html

I had them make me a shorter version of their bite
valve drinking tube. Their neck strap (with the wire
inside) does a good job at keeping the mothpiece
within reach. I use Platypus Big-Zip containers and
put them under the bungies on the back deck of the ski
or behind the seat of my kayaks (also attached with a
bungie so it doesn't slide). It just takes a second to
slip the tube through the skirt top and velcro it onto
the neck strap as I get in so I usually don't think
twice about it. Wearing a half gallon of water on you
pfd raises the center of gravity more then I like and
messes up rotation.

I also have (but have not installed) the SA Tripper
hydration system that goes on the deck infront of you
on the ski. It looks to be well made but I am
skeptical at how you would keep the permantly mounted
bladder clean so I haven't used it. It is well thought
of in SA Ski circles though. OceanPaddlesports sells 1
and 3 litre sizes

Hope this helps.

Guy
--- dlkjr@... wrote:
On a similar note, has anyone rigged up a workable
hands-free hydration system for
use with their surfski (or decked kayak)? How do
you keep the tube/mouthpiece near
your mouth? Where do you put the water bag?
Benefits and disadvantages?


Hydration + paddle leash

Reivers Dustin
 

I paddle a Speedster which is hard to keep upright sometimes. These
boats have a factory hatch between the legs. So I bought an extra
hatch cover, drilled it to pass the hydration tube through and now
put the bladder inside. So the Center of Gravity is lowest. It's so
good I sometimes use the full water just for the ballast effect.

I did the same for my old Valhalla, but it's more of a hassle due to
the Keelson down the middle.

By the way, I've got a new religion: use a paddle leash. I wound up
swimming after my wind-blown Speedster at the end of a short race.
No way could I catch the bugger.


Re: hands free hydration

Laura Jackson
 

I agree with Guy re: paddling with a water bag on your back. I also worry about being attached to my boat via a drinking tube that is held tightly in place (it also gets in the way for races with a run or portage element). I typically use an older style camelback or Ultimate Directions pack, turned sideways to serve as a fanny pack and run the tube up inside my shirt or PFD, clip the provided clip to my bra strap, and all I have to do is turn my head, bite and get a drink. The water bag rests on the back deck of the boat, and I keep the belt loose enough that the bag stays put while I rotate.

Laura J.

_________________________________________________________________
Working moms: Find helpful tips here on managing kids, home, work � and yourself. http://special.msn.com/msnbc/workingmom.armx


The Rower's Almanac

lampi@...
 

I have two copies of the Rower's Almanac (2004-2005) put out by
RowersAlmanac.Com available, courtesy of Maas Boats.

They will go to the first two people who ask for them and either come
and get them or send me a SASE with postage for about 1 pound, or a
UPS account.

Any takers?

--Michael Lampi
--Bellevue, WA

P.S. They make nice stocking stuffers, though one got a little crunched.
:-)


Re: [surfski] Race timing/organizing Software

Laura Jackson
 

At the other end of the spectrum are products like RegattaMaster ($329). (see www.regattamaster.com)

This PC-based product is designed around managing rowing events, from a small time-trial event, on up to Nationals with over 100 heats and finals and 1000+ competitors. It can track data over multiple regattas (such as national membership numbers, liability waivers, racer's age) and even do event entry fees by person. It can do seedings, and for events with heats and finals, it can automate the progression and lane assignment per the protocol for the event. I've used the product a number of times, and as the finish line person and race results manager, I can say that it does everything I need except make me coffee!

I'm currently working with the designers of the product to develop a sprint kayak module and explore potential customization for other sports (e.g. events with a broad array of rowing and paddling, outrigger races, etc.)

Laura Jackson

_________________________________________________________________
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New Year's Paddle

Reivers Dustin
 

It was a cool paddle on B'ham bay. A large clutch of W.A.K.E.
(Whatcom Area Kayak Enthusiat) paddlers launched before the Sound
Rower group for a hot meal across the bay.

The Sounders headed out of the bay and South to Chuckanut Island and
back. It was a dis-connected group of about a half-dozen mostly over-
dressed paddlers with one rogue rower in evidence. An OC-1 and an OC-
2 rounded out the gaggle.

The outbound leg was fun with a breeze and wave push. Coming back
was a slog against the cool breeze and some rebound around the
floating dry-dock.

Lunch later at the Colophon Cafe was good. It took a long time for
the warm coffee to reach down to my cold feet. But trading just a
few of the usual insults with the gang warmed my paddling spirit up
right away.

rd


Re: Digest Number 26

Laura Jackson
 

Reivers:
Sounds like fun! Here in Portland, our annual "Head of the Year" sort of fell apart due to icy roads and docks. The original plan included several single shells, 4's and a couple paddlers doing a 13 mile straight shot down the Willamette to a sister rowing club, shuttle back and have brunch. Travel conditions that morning made it so only 5 people, including 2 cox'n's showed up. The three rowers did about 500 meters upstream, coasted back to the dock and headed for Starbucks.

I chose not to drive, as our street was really icy, so my stepson and I took our mountain bikes out and surveyed the winter wonderland that way.

Happy New Year to all!

_________________________________________________________________
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Re: New Year's Paddle

Michael Lampi <lampi@...>
 

--- In SoundRowers@..., "onereivers" <reivers@c...> wrote:
It was a cool paddle on B'ham bay. A large clutch of W.A.K.E.
(Whatcom Area Kayak Enthusiat) paddlers launched before the Sound
Rower group for a hot meal across the bay.

The Sounders headed out of the bay and South to Chuckanut Island and
back. It was a dis-connected group of about a half-dozen mostly over-
dressed paddlers with one rogue rower in evidence. An OC-1 and an OC-
2 rounded out the gaggle.
[...]
Sounds like you had a great time!

Just out of curiosity, since this was a social event, about how fast
did most of the people go?

It's been too long since I've been on the water. I'm in withdrawal.

:-(

--Michael Lampi


Alden Ocean Double For Sale

Brian <aldenrower@...>
 

Fully equipped Alden Ocean double for sale. Two sets of deltor
blades. Two sliding seats. Bow and Stearn hatches. Primex cart.
Rigging tools. British Racing Green. Yakima Hully Rollers/TLC
saddle rack mount. $2500 obo. Located in Puyallup, WA. Email
aldenrower@... for pictures.

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